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The new book from the Lindisfarne Community - Secular Monasticism: A Journey.

Like an underground river, the monastic tradition keeps on resurging in a host of unexpected times and places. Secular Monasticism, A Journey describes one of its most recent incarnations. The founders and members of the Lindisfarne Community share with us their bold attempt to be a secular monastic religious order open to the exigencies of the contemporary world. Age-old wisdom once again reveals its perennial relevance in helping us learn how to be followers of Christ in God’s today.
Brother John, Taizé

In the first five pages, I thought of ten people I know who should read this book: young people, old people, all people tired of taken-for-granted spirituality.

Devour this book. Let it help you dream up a way of joining or creating a micro-community of prayer and action that frees you to experiment in following the ways of Christ. That's what these folks have done.

This story helps us imagine ourselves out of the boxes and buildings Christianity has become.
The Rev. Dr. Dori Baker
Scholar-in-Residence, The Fund for Theological Education

Lindisfarne Community has graciously accepted God’s call to dance with the radical (and sometimes wearying) changes of our time. Like the Celts, they find meaning in their ongoing spiritual evolution through poetry and story, through a willingness to navigate the waters of the soul while remaining fiercely loyal to the good earth that bore us and nurtures us. Like the Celts, this family of secular monastics hungers more for mystical union with the Divine Mystery than for any trappings of earthly renown or success.
Carl McColman, author and blogger (from the foreword)


I had the honor and privilege of contributing a chapter to this book. You can purchase it in hardback, softback, or e-book.



~~~
In the Love of the Three in One,

Br Jack+, LC

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