Skip to main content

Happy Lucid Lynx Day!

Today, as can be seen by the little widget to the right, Ubuntu 10.04, the Lucid Lynx, has arrived.  For those of you who don't know (and if not, where have you been spending your time?), Ubuntu is a free Operating System (OS).  Similar to Windows and Mac but it is based on the Linux kernel (the brain that runs the OS) and is malware and virus free.  That's right.  Free means it doesn't cost you a dime and it doesn't get infections!

Ubuntu has many different applications already installed - OpenOffice for office production, F-Spot for all your picture needs, Rhythmbox for listening to music (with an integration in the new Ubuntu One Music Store), and the list goes on and on.  Plus, it has a new Software Center which houses tens of thousands of applications that allows you to search and install them with just a couple of mouse clicks.

Another great feature about Ubuntu 10.04 is that it is a Long Term Support (LTS) release.  This means that, while Ubuntu has a new release every six months, an LTS is released every two years and is supported for three years.  This means that you can install 10.04 and be assured of support for three years with updates and security fixes.

Additionally, one of the coolest things to come about is the ability to try Ubuntu out before you install it.  This is accomplished through something called a 'Live CD'.  What this means is that you can take the Ubuntu 10.04 CD, put it in your CD-ROM drive, reboot your computer, and run your computer from the Ubuntu 10.04 CD.  This allows the whole OS to run from the disc and you can see how it works with your computer's hardware before you install it.  Once you see that it will work with your hardware (and I'm most certain that it will), you can just click in the 'Install' icon and install it on your computer's hard drive, just like Windows.

And speaking of Windows and installing Ubuntu 10.04, you can choose to install Ubuntu right next to Windows in what is called a 'dual-boot'.  That is, when you turn your computer on, you can then choose which OS you want to run - Ubuntu or Windows.  I would recommend this for a couple of weeks until you become comfortable with Ubuntu.

One last thing.  Ubuntu is a very 'light' OS.  That is, there is not a lot of bloat running in it.  You can easily install and use it on much older hardware.  This means that you wouldn't have to purchase a new computer every few years.  I have tried it out on several laptops and have not had any issues.  Heck, my old laptop was roughly 5 - 7 years old and it ran Ubuntu without any issues at all.  And it was fast.


If your needing some more in-depth information, I recommend the manual for Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx.  You can get that here.  And, yes, it too is free.


So, Happy Lucid Lynx Day!  Go get your own copy of Ubuntu 10.04 and take it for a spin.  You can thank me later.


~~~
In the Love of the Three in One,

Jack

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Pipe Smoking—The Why

“I believe that many who find that ‘nothing happens’ when they sit down, or kneel down, to a book of devotion, would find that the heart sings unbidden while they are working their way through a tough bit of theology with a pipe in their teeth and a pencil in their hand.” — C.S. Lewis

In my last post I talked about my ingress into the fantastical world of pipe smoking. In this post, I want to talk about the “why’s,” the reasons I smoke a pipe. And that’s an important distinction. I’m not saying why you should smoke a pipe, I’m only speaking from my experience.

So, why did I start smoking a pipe?

I’m not really sure. Seriously. I just sort of fell into it. I mean, I guess part of it is the “old world” feel about smoking a pipe. I’m a lost romantic in a very unromantic world. I like “old” things—antiques, craftsmanship, clothes1, shaving2, etc.—and pipe smoking fits into a lot of those categories. There’s a quote I use when I give retreats on Celtic Christian Spirituality that goes like th…

Pipe Smoking—The Beginning

“I believe that many who find that ‘nothing happens’ when they sit down, or kneel down, to a book of devotion, would find that the heart sings unbidden while they are working their way through a tough bit of theology with a pipe in their teeth and a pencil in their hand.” — C.S. Lewis



As many of you know, I smoke a pipe. And while I really don’t mention it a lot on this blog, if you were to visit me we would, more likely than not, find ourselves sitting outside having a nice conversation and I’d be smoking a pipe. I might even offer you one, if you’re so inclined.

What I’d like to do is write a little series on pipe smoking. Perhaps some “how to’s” and what not. Who knows? I might even start a YouTube channel about it.

But one thing I’d like to try to do is tie pipe smoking together with theology and biblical study. A lot of people find the two—pipe smoking and spiritual commitment—diametrically opposed to one another. But as we saw in the Lewis quote above, it can be quite helpful and s…

Pipe Smoking—The Pipe Parts and Stuff

“I believe that many who find that ‘nothing happens’ when they sit down, or kneel down, to a book of devotion, would find that the heart sings unbidden while they are working their way through a tough bit of theology with a pipe in their teeth and a pencil in their hand.” — C.S. Lewis

In our previous post, we talked about the different shapes of a smoking pipe. So today we’re going to talk about the different parts of a pipe and some of the tools you’ll need for smoking your pipe.

Now that you have your first pipe (congratulations, by the way!), let’s talk about the different parts of your pipe.


As you can see in the above image, a pipe has two basic sections, the stummel and the stem. The stummel is the wood part and the stem is the mouthpiece.

The stummel can be made of different material but is generally briar wood. Briar (Fr. bruyère)comes from a flowering, evergreen shrub (erica arborea) in the heather family that grows in the Mediterranean Basin. After the shrub has reached maturity…