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How Far We've Come!

Then, turning to his disciples, Jesus said, “That is why I tell you not to worry about everyday life—whether you have enough food to eat or enough clothes to wear. For life is more than food, and your body more than clothing. Look at the ravens. They don’t plant or harvest or store food in barns, for God feeds them. And you are far more valuable to him than any birds! Can all your worries add a single moment to your life? And if worry can’t accomplish a little thing like that, what’s the use of worrying over bigger things?“Look at the lilies and how they grow. They don’t work or make their clothing, yet Solomon in all his glory was not dressed as beautifully as they are. And if God cares so wonderfully for flowers that are here today and thrown into the fire tomorrow, he will certainly care for you. Why do you have so little faith?

“And don’t be concerned about what to eat and what to drink. Don’t worry about such things. These things dominate the thoughts of unbelievers all over the world, but your Father already knows your needs. Seek the Kingdom of God above all else, and he will give you everything you need.

“So don’t be afraid, little flock. For it gives your Father great happiness to give you the Kingdom.

“Sell your possessions and give to those in need. This will store up treasure for you in heaven! And the purses of heaven never get old or develop holes. Your treasure will be safe; no thief can steal it and no moth can destroy it. Wherever your treasure is, there the desires of your heart will also be.

Luke 12.22-34.



Have you ever noticed how far we have come from a biblical worldview? Today, we have a lot of talk, from Christian and secular sources, that such-and-such is a 'natural instinct'. For the Christian, this means that God is the author of so-called 'natural instinct'. To the other person, this means that this is just the way things are. Either way, it seems to indicate that God is no longer involved with creation. That God is somehow removed from creation. This is Deism. That is, 'god' is a remote landlord. This is not the view of the Bible. Notice again what Jesus said,
'Look at the ravens. They don’t plant or harvest or store food in barns, for God feeds them. And you are far more valuable to him than any birds! ...Look at the lilies and how they grow. They don’t work or make their clothing,...And if God cares so wonderfully for flowers...he will certainly care for you. Why do you have so little faith?'

Jesus says that it is God who does those things! God is the one who is actually taking care of the birds and the flowers! Any other type of response in the mouths of Christians is, well, unchristian. This is the way things truly are; not the way they are perceived by the 'natural' person. St Paul said, 'Those who are unspiritual (or 'natural') do not receive the gifts of God’s Spirit, for they are foolishness to them, and they are unable to understand them because they are discerned spiritually' (1Cor. 2.14). In other words, you would expect to hear things are 'natural instinct' from the 'unspiritual' person. But may it never be from the mouths of Christians! Perhaps I'm naive. But to me, the naive person is the one who does not recognize the Creator's handiwork and give homage to the Creator. 'Things are not that simple. We have discovered that things are more complex than simple faith will allow.' I think it is the other way around. Things are that simple but when we remove any acknowledgment of God from the conversation, then things become complex.

Jesus said our faith must mimic that of a child. For children, things really are that simple. The birds are fed because God feeds them. The flowers are beautiful because God made them that way.
Eternal God, Creator of all that is seen and unseen, grant us eyes to see your hand, your Spirit, in all things; give us the words of praise to acknowledge your glory; grant unto us, O Sovereign LORD, the faith of a child. We humbly ask this through the world's rightful King, your Son, our Savior, Jesus Christ, who reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, One God, forever and ever. Amen.

Peace be with you.

+ OD

Comments

Ted Gossard said…
I think there's alot of truth here, OD. Faith simply accepts God at his word, and is willing to live with some things unanswered, I think many things unanswered. This is a large part of what it means to walk by faith, not by sight, and live as God's children in this world.

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