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Pipes

As some of you have noticed, I smoke a pipe (there is at least one picture around here that shows that). I have been smoking a pipe for several years now. My Grandfather smoked a pipe. My good friend Jeff, who had been smoking a pipe for awhile, started me smoking a pipe. It's an interesting story.

When leaving one night, Jeff asked if he could through away some of his pipe paraphernalia. The sliding rear window in his pickup had broken and it had rained and got his pipe bag wet. He felt that some of the stuff had ruined because they had gotten soaked. After he left, I looked through the thrown out stash and found a pipe that wasn't too bad. It was a Dr Grabow bent pipe with a 9mm paper filter. I let it dry out and the next time he came over I took it out and asked him how to smoke it.  Later, I went to a local tobacconist and asked them if they had any pointers.  They handed me some 8.5"x11" sheets of paper on how to smoke a briar pipe and how to care for it.  I purchased an inexpensive Italian Second (which means, that it is an Italian made pipe, usually a 'name brand' but wasn't good enough for their primary collection) which I still have.  After smoking for a while and trying other cheap pipes and tobacco, I discovered what was to be my all time favorite brand of pipe -- Peterson.

Peterson pipes have been a round for roughly 140 years.  Initially started by the Nurnberg brothers, Friedrich and Heinrich Kapp, in Dublin, Ireland, 1865 under the name 'Kapp Brothers'.  Soon afterwards, Charles Peterson entered their shop and showed them a revolutionary pipe.  After showing them his pipe, Peterson suggested that they all become partners and make his dream pipe the world's dream pipe.  They agreed and the company was renamed Kapp & Peterson.peterson.jpg

In 1890, Peterson's 'System Pipe' was introduced.  This pipe contains a small chamber to capture the moisture one procures when smoking.  This added feature makes for a cool, dry smoke.

In 1898, Peterson introduced the 'Peterson Lip' (or 'P-lip') mouthpiece.  This change from the traditional 'fishtail' mouthpiece, draws the smoke to the roof of the mouth, helping to eliminate 'tongue bite'.

Today, I smoke (almost) exclusively Peterson Pipes.  I have three system pipes and a couple from some of the other lines (Aran and Emerald, if you must know).  I would love to add a Deluxe Quality System pipe to my collection.  I keep looking on e-Bay, but always miss the auction.

Until tomorrow,

Peace be with you.

+ OD

Comments

Anglican said…
Ugh. Change=chance. I need another cup of coffee.
Anglican said…
Have you had a change to try that new one yet?
Odysseus said…
Yep. I've smoked it about three times. Smokes wonderfully. Thanks for the gift.

Peace be with you.

+ OD
Anglican said…
You're welcome. I'm glad it has a new home.
Ted Gossard said…
I remember the time I went to Calvin Seminary to visit Dr. John Stek. Really all I would have had to hear was follow the scent of fine tobacco pipe smoke. Well, he was in his office with his pipe; it did smell good.

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