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Another satisfied customer!

Last time I posted, I talked about PCLOS. Well, this week I did some work for a lady who needed a laptop looked at. I know the people she works for (good people) and they needed me to look at some enterprise stuff as well. So Thursday I stopped by to take a look.

The desktop was alright except for some spyware (17 -- including websearch). The antivirus app she uses (it came with the CPU) wasn't updating. So I uninstalled it and loaded the free AVG. A great little app that I have used for a few years now.

At the same time, I started looking at the laptop. I can sum up its condition in one word -- dirty. The problem was not so much that (although it was a factor) but the fact that it was running hot. Very hot. And when it got too hot, thankfully, it would shut down. I had to take it with me. It was going to be a Father's Day gift for her husband if I could get it up and running.

In the meantime, I showed her PCLOS. She really liked it. Since her husband is 'new' to computers and he was probably only going to use it for 'checking email, surfing the web, writing an occasional letter', I told her PCLOS would be perfect for that. It's free. Not only is it a free OS but it is free from viruses and spyware (the problem she was having on her desktop). She played around with it some more (oh, I forgot to mention, I had a LiveCD with me). She said if it was really working well for her husband, she would have me install it on her laptop (it is the same model).

Well, I left with the laptop and worked on it some more at home. Or, I tried to. It kept shutting down on me. I had it plugged in but maybe there was a problem with the power supply and battery? After a while of that (about 6 or 7 attempts just to get it to stay on), I shut it down for the night and tried again in the morning. The same problem. So, I did some research (and this is what I love about what I do. If I can't figure it out, someone out there in TechWorld has). I discovered that my first thought was correct. The problem was with over heating and that I needed to clean out the vents (a documented problem). You should have seen the stuff fly out of there! OMG. No wonder it was over heating! According to the article, this should be done at least every month because of the poor ventilation of this laptop.

So, I cleaned all of the gunk out of it and then thoroughly cleaned the keyboard, ports, casing, etc (this took over an hour -- like I said, it was dirty). Then I booted up PCLOS. It found everything just fine (like I had any doubt). Installed it. Updated it. Installed new apps (OpenOffice in particular). Installed fonts. Started putting it through the paces. No problems. No over heating. No shutting down. It all ran just like it was supposed to. I then called my customer and she was thrilled. When I got it home, I put in X2 to see how the DVD capabilities worked (it has a combo drive). Worked like a champ. The more I use this OS the more surprised I am.

She picked it up and is very happy!

May mercy, peace, and love be yours in abundance.

+OD

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